The Best 4K Monitors

The Best 4K Monitors

Our pick

HP Z27

HP Z27

The HP Z27 has great color accuracy, an adjustable stand, a variety of useful ports—including a USB-C port with DisplayPort and 65 W power delivery—and a three-year warranty.

Buying Options

$540 from HP

The HP Z27 is the best 4K monitor especially if you have a USB-C laptop or plan to get one, which is more and more likely in 2020. The screen is one of the most color-accurate we found, and its stand is more adjustable than most, with tilt, pivot, swivel, and height adjustments that make it easy to set at the correct height and position for your needs, especially if multiple people share the same monitor. The USB-C port means that if you have a compatible laptop, such as a recent MacBook or Windows ultrabook, you can use the single USB-C connection to connect to the screen, charge your laptop at up to 65 W, and power the monitor’s two USB 3.0 ports for use with mice, keyboards, storage, or other devices, all at the same time; this dramatically reduces the number of cables around your desk. The monitor also has thin bezels, so the screen appears larger and the monitor takes up less space than some other models. (Thin bezels also just look better.) HP covers the Z27 with a three-year warranty and a dead-pixel policy that should be a comfort to anyone buying a 4K monitor.

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Runner-up

Lenovo ThinkVision P27u

Lenovo ThinkVision P27u

The Lenovo ThinkVision P27u is a great runner-up with a color-accurate screen, a versatile stand, and a convenient USB-C connection, though it’s a bit uglier than the HP Z27 and its contrast ratio isn’t as good.

Buying Options

$464* from Lenovo

*At the time of publishing, the price was $474.

The Lenovo ThinkVision P27u is a good runner-up option if the HP Z27 is out of stock or too expensive. Its colors are a bit more accurate than the Z27’s—albeit not in ways that are detectable to the naked eye—but its contrast ratio is a bit worse, which is noticeable. Its adjustable stand lifts, tilts, and pivots, but it doesn’t swivel like the Z27’s does. Nor is this monitor as aesthetically pleasing: Its buttons are on the front, its base is rounded instead of squared, and a thick neck connects the monitor to the base, in contrast to the HP design’s thinner, dual stems. Like the HP, the Lenovo can connect and charge a laptop via USB-C, and it includes a useful DisplayPort connection as well as HDMI and USB 3.0 ports. Like the Z27, the ThinkVision P27u has thin bezels around the sides and the top, which makes its screen nice to look at. It comes with a three-year warranty, too.

Budget pick

Dell UltraSharp U2718Q

Dell UltraSharp U2718Q

A great 4K monitor without USB-C

The U2718Q is as ergonomically useful as the HP Z27 and is pretty color-accurate, but its grays sometimes have a noticeable color tint, and it doesn’t offer any USB-C ports.

Buying Options

$545 from Dell
$400 from Amazon

Although the Dell UltraSharp U2718Q offers an amount of adjustability similar to that of the HP Z27 to accommodate different postures at work, in our testing it wasn’t as color-accurate—in particular, its grayscales were inaccurate, which could lend a colored tint to monochrome images. It also lacks USB-C connectivity. We think USB-C support on a monitor is worth paying more for in 2020, but if you don’t think the same—for example, if you plan to use your monitor only with desktop computers that have discrete graphics cards, which don’t usually support USB-C—you can typically save about $100 by buying the U2718Q instead of the HP Z27 or Lenovo P27u. The U2718Q comes with a useful three-year warranty, as well as a Premium Panel Guarantee that covers defective pixels; if there’s even one bright pixel, Dell will replace the whole monitor.

If you buy the Dell U2718Q, make sure it’s running firmware version M2B102 or newer, and update it following these steps if necessary; older firmware versions produced visibly inaccurate greens and yellows that this firmware version fixes.

Upgrade pick

Dell UltraSharp U3219Q

Dell UltraSharp U3219Q

A 32-inch 4K monitor

The Dell U3219Q is more expensive than the HP Z27, but it has comparable color accuracy and USB-C connectivity, and it offers a larger display and a built-in KVM feature that lets you use it with two computers at the same time.

Buying Options

$810* from Dell

*At the time of publishing, the price was $745.

If you want a physically larger screen, a monitor you can use with two computers at the same time, or one that can charge a 15-inch MacBook Pro at full speed over its USB-C port, we recommend the 32-inch Dell UltraSharp U3219Q. Its color accuracy is comparable to that of our top picks, and it has plenty of ports, including a USB-C port that can receive the video signal, provide a data connection between your computer and the monitor’s USB 3.0 ports, and charge your laptop at up to 90 W. The U3219Q also has rare features such as a built-in KVM (keyboard, video, mouse) feature and picture-by-picture mode, which allow you to use a single keyboard and mouse to control two computers and even view both on screen simultaneously. The U3219Q costs nearly $200 more than our pick at the moment and takes up significantly more space, but if you want to avoid scaling or you’re running a two-computer setup, it’s an excellent choice.

Also great

Dell P2415Q

Dell P2415Q

A great 24-inch 4K monitor

This model is a smaller, older monitor with great colors and the same dead-pixel policy and warranty as the HP Z27, but it has thick bezels, older inputs, and no USB-C.

Buying Options

$450* from Dell

*At the time of publishing, the price was $422.

If you don’t have room on your desk for a 27-inch monitor but you still want a good 4K screen, get Dell’s P2415Q. The P2415Q’s screen is 3 inches smaller diagonally than the HP Z27’s, with extremely accurate colors and similar features. It has HDMI and DisplayPort connections plus four USB 3.0 ports, and its stand is just as adjustable as that of the Z27. The relatively thick screen bezel makes it look chunky next to newer 4K monitors, but it’s still the best 24-inch 4K monitor we’ve tested. It comes with the same dead-pixel policy and warranty as the Dell U2718Q. It doesn’t have USB-C support, but we can’t find a 24-inch 4K monitor that does.

Everything we recommend

Our pick

HP Z27

HP Z27

The HP Z27 has great color accuracy, an adjustable stand, a variety of useful ports—including a USB-C port with DisplayPort and 65 W power delivery—and a three-year warranty.

Buying Options

$540 from HP

Runner-up

Lenovo ThinkVision P27u

Lenovo ThinkVision P27u

The Lenovo ThinkVision P27u is a great runner-up with a color-accurate screen, a versatile stand, and a convenient USB-C connection, though it’s a bit uglier than the HP Z27 and its contrast ratio isn’t as good.

Buying Options

$464* from Lenovo

*At the time of publishing, the price was $474.

Budget pick

Dell UltraSharp U2718Q

Dell UltraSharp U2718Q

A great 4K monitor without USB-C

The U2718Q is as ergonomically useful as the HP Z27 and is pretty color-accurate, but its grays sometimes have a noticeable color tint, and it doesn’t offer any USB-C ports.

Buying Options

$545 from Dell
$400 from Amazon

Upgrade pick

Dell UltraSharp U3219Q

Dell UltraSharp U3219Q

A 32-inch 4K monitor

The Dell U3219Q is more expensive than the HP Z27, but it has comparable color accuracy and USB-C connectivity, and it offers a larger display and a built-in KVM feature that lets you use it with two computers at the same time.

Buying Options

$810* from Dell

*At the time of publishing, the price was $745.

Also great

Dell P2415Q

Dell P2415Q

A great 24-inch 4K monitor

This model is a smaller, older monitor with great colors and the same dead-pixel policy and warranty as the HP Z27, but it has thick bezels, older inputs, and no USB-C.

Buying Options

$450* from Dell

*At the time of publishing, the price was $422.

Source: NY Times – Wirecutter

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