The Best Gaming Mouse

The Best Gaming Mouse

Our pick

Logitech G502 Hero

Logitech G502 Hero

The best gaming mouse

The G502 Hero is comfortable for most hand sizes and grip styles, and it offers plenty of buttons, excellent build quality, and adjustable weights.

Buying Options

$47 from Amazon
$48 from Best Buy

The Logitech G502 Hero is a widely loved gaming mouse because it’s comfortable for most hand sizes and grip types, and because it offers a wealth of responsive buttons, excellent build quality, RGB lights, and customizable weights. And it’s reasonably priced—the next-best option typically costs nearly twice as much. Most people find the G502 Hero’s size and shape comfortable, according to owner reviews, though a couple of our testers discovered that the G502’s many buttons could make it difficult to find a comfortable grip. Like almost all gaming mice, the G502 Hero uses mechanical switches, a small percentage of which can fail and inadvertently send double-clicks under certain conditions, a problem that should be covered by Logitech’s two-year warranty.

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Runner-up

Razer Basilisk V2

Razer Basilisk V2

The next-best option

The Basilisk V2 is pricier but even more comfortable. It has a similar number of buttons and features, but Razer’s Synapse 3 software doesn’t work on macOS.

Buying Options

$80* from Amazon
$71 from Best Buy

*At the time of publishing, the price was $71.

If you don’t mind paying more, or if the G502 Hero is unavailable or more expensive, get the Razer Basilisk V2. It’s almost identical in shape to the G502 Hero, but it’s even more comfortable because its buttons are better placed, its scroll wheel tension is customizable, and its optical switches don’t have the same flaws as the mechanical ones found in most gaming mice. We don’t think most people should pay nearly double for the Basilisk V2 over the G502 Hero, and Razer’s Synapse 3 software doesn’t support macOS. But our panelists preferred the Basilisk V2 overall.

Budget pick

Logitech G203

Logitech G203

Excellent performance for less

The Logitech G203 is smaller than our top picks and has fewer buttons, but it’s just as customizable and its sensor is plenty accurate.

Buying Options

$40 from Best Buy

If you want the cheapest good gaming mouse, get the Logitech G203, which comes in Lightsync and Prodigy variations. (They’re nearly identical—the Lightsync model has customizable RGB lighting zones, while the Prodigy supports RGB but can display only one uniform color at a time.) The G203 has an accurate sensor and responsive, satisfying buttons; it’s also customizable, and it doesn’t feel as cheap as its low price suggests. Compared with our top picks, it’s smaller and not as comfortable, it offers fewer buttons, and it has worse build quality, but it’s by far the best gaming mouse in this price range.

Upgrade pick

Razer Basilisk Ultimate

Razer Basilisk Ultimate

A wireless upgrade

The Basilisk Ultimate is the best wireless gaming mouse thanks to its comfortable shape, well-placed buttons, optical switches, and decent battery life.

Buying Options

$150 from Amazon
$150 from Best Buy

If you want a great wireless gaming mouse and don’t mind paying a lot more to go cord-free, get the Razer Basilisk Ultimate. It’s virtually identical to the wired Basilisk V2 in size, shape, switches, number and placement of buttons, and customizable scroll wheel. It’s the most comfortable of all the wireless mice we tested, too, and we didn’t experience any connection issues. On top of that, the Basilisk Ultimate is just as fast and responsive as a wired gaming mouse, and it has decent battery life.

Also great

Razer Basilisk X HyperSpeed

Razer Basilisk X HyperSpeed

A cheaper wireless mouse

The Basilisk X HyperSpeed has fewer buttons and no lighting, but it’s comfortable, accurate, and responsive, and it can connect via USB or Bluetooth.

Buying Options

$55* from Amazon
$60 from Best Buy

*At the time of publishing, the price was $60.

If you want a less expensive wireless gaming mouse, the best option is the Razer Basilisk X HyperSpeed, which sacrifices some buttons and features compared with our top pick. It’s identical in shape to the wired Basilisk V2, but it’s a stripped-down version that lacks the thumb clutch, the customizable scroll wheel, and lighting. It has only six buttons: left-click, right-click, two buttons on the left side, scroll-click, and one button below the scroll wheel. The X HyperSpeed also uses mechanical switches instead of Razer’s new optical switches. But it can connect via USB dongle or Bluetooth, and it’s just as accurate and responsive as our other picks.

Everything we recommend

Our pick

Logitech G502 Hero

Logitech G502 Hero

The best gaming mouse

The G502 Hero is comfortable for most hand sizes and grip styles, and it offers plenty of buttons, excellent build quality, and adjustable weights.

Buying Options

$47 from Amazon
$48 from Best Buy

Runner-up

Razer Basilisk V2

Razer Basilisk V2

The next-best option

The Basilisk V2 is pricier but even more comfortable. It has a similar number of buttons and features, but Razer’s Synapse 3 software doesn’t work on macOS.

Buying Options

$80* from Amazon
$71 from Best Buy

*At the time of publishing, the price was $71.

Budget pick

Logitech G203

Logitech G203

Excellent performance for less

The Logitech G203 is smaller than our top picks and has fewer buttons, but it’s just as customizable and its sensor is plenty accurate.

Buying Options

$40 from Best Buy

Upgrade pick

Razer Basilisk Ultimate

Razer Basilisk Ultimate

A wireless upgrade

The Basilisk Ultimate is the best wireless gaming mouse thanks to its comfortable shape, well-placed buttons, optical switches, and decent battery life.

Buying Options

$150 from Amazon
$150 from Best Buy

Also great

Razer Basilisk X HyperSpeed

Razer Basilisk X HyperSpeed

A cheaper wireless mouse

The Basilisk X HyperSpeed has fewer buttons and no lighting, but it’s comfortable, accurate, and responsive, and it can connect via USB or Bluetooth.

Buying Options

$55* from Amazon
$60 from Best Buy

*At the time of publishing, the price was $60.

Source: NY Times – Wirecutter

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